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Grammar Gram #3: And I Quote

We’re in the communications business. And part of being a good communicator is minding your p’s and q’s. In this blog series, senior copywriter Mike Mathieu gives grammar lessons you might actually remember next time you’re communicating something important. Do quotation marks fall outside or inside other punctuation marks? As usual in grammar, it depends. […]

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Grammar Gram! Volume 2

We’re in the communications business. And part of being a good communicator is minding your p’s and q’s. In this blog series, senior copywriter Mike Mathieu gives grammar lessons you might actually remember next time you’re communicating something important. Tip #1: The Hyphen and the Adverb Pop quiz: Is the Grammar Gram an “extremely-useful” resource […]

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Grammar Gram! Volume 1

We’re in the communications business. And part of being a good communicator is minding your p’s and q’s. In this blog series, senior copywriter Mike Mathieu gives grammar lessons you might actually remember next time you’re communicating something important. Tip #1: Polishing Up Parentheses Does closing punctuation fall inside or outside parentheses? It depends. To […]

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AP: “We’re ‘Over’ the Exclusive Use of ‘More Than’ For Numerical Values”

Last week, the world was thrown into a tizzy when the Associated Press announced that it would accept the use of “over” as a synonym to “more than” when referencing numerical values. You may laugh, but for those of us in public relations and journalism, this is big news.The use of “more than” when talking […]

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9 AP Style Rules Every PR Intern Should Know

The one and only college class I ever got a “C” in was AP Style Writing. I remember how my professor would copy each of our weekly news stories onto transparency sheets, projecting the mess of red lines, question marks and “Boring!” comments for the whole class to see. He’d walk through all the flaws, each mistake dropping our grade by ten percent. It truly was painful to watch your “B” go to a “D” in a matter of a missed hyphen, uppercased title and abbreviated five-letter state, especially in front of your friends you just tailgated with the weekend prior.

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