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When it comes to analytics, social strategists care about different metrics than the C-Suite. Strategists need metrics that can help inform and revise campaign strategies and tactics — metrics that will help move the needle in the weeks and months ahead. The C-Suite wants to measure the impact on the bottom line.

So when your senior leadership team is talking about the bottom line, you won’t command attention by speaking about fans, followers, likes or views.

Typically, you won’t attract attention by talking about engagement either. But if you mention the cost per engagement, that’s a different story. If you can demonstrate how reputation can be improved or how costs were reduced, chances are the C-Suite will listen.

Specifically, here are some typical ways that social strategists use analytics:

  • Set realistic expectations and communications objectives.
  • Formulate campaign strategies and tactics.
  • Monitor progress against performance targets.
  • Listen more closely to the market and to customers.
  • Benchmark and learn from competitive successes and failures.
  • Define conversations, identify trends and refine messages.

Here are some typical metrics for the C-Suite:

  • Increased revenue
  • Increased profit
  • Saved cost
  • Improved reputation

In all cases, metrics must be tied to the goals of your organization and measurable objectives.

In addition, analytics should be an ongoing process, not random acts of measurement, or metrics gathered only at the end of a campaign.

Effective campaign and/or program analytics require measurement at the beginning to create a benchmark with baseline findings, and then ongoing, consistent measurement to demonstrate month-to-month improvement and to provide insight into effectiveness and progress on goals and objectives.

Ultimately, having solid metrics is vital to obtaining the support of senior executives and proving the value of your contribution to a company’s business, especially in this age of increasing time investment in social media.

Photo courtesy of AMagill.

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