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Ahhh, the holidays. It’s a time of year to cherish as we step away from our monitors and cubes to share good food and conversation with family and friends.

For one particular nonprofit in Seattle, the unique ritual of enjoying a warm meal is much more than a means of satisfying hunger for those in need. It’s also a crucial moment for establishing support and community to help foster change in the lives of hundreds of homeless Seattle teens.

Meet Teen Feed.

Established in 1986 by a group of nurses at the University of Washington, Teen Feed serves an average of 40-50 youth and young adults around the University district every night of the week. The good work of the organization doesn’t stop there. More than just a meal supplier, Teen Feed also runs two additional programs (Service Links for Youth and Street Talk Outreach Program) to help connect with high risk youths in their own environment and support their transition from life on the streets.

I first learned about Teen Feed last month after attending a charity show at the Crocodile Cafe coordinated by one of my favorite artists (Ben Gibbard). While at the show, I discovered that Ben’s sister Megan is the current Executive Director of Teen Feed and the passionate leader of a nimble but highly impactful staff and group of volunteers. To say the fundraising show was a success would be quite the understatement. It was spectacular to see such a great response from the Seattle community.

Teen Feed Staff

Although donations are crucial to helping Teen Feed provide hot meals to youths each night, there is something simple we can all do to help support homeless teens. What might that be you ask?

Socks.

That’s correct. Socks. During the show, Megan made a particular mention of socks being a highly requested clothing item from Teen Feed guests each night. Simple enough.

Give Teen Feed a like and a follow and if you’re interested in lending Megan a helping hand this holiday season, reach out, put a collection box in your office and truthfully tell your coworkers to “put a sock in it.”


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